PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH AT BAY CITY.


BAY CITY.

TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH AND SUNDAY-SCHOOL

[Extracts from a Sermon by Rev. J. Ambrose Wight, D. D., Pastor, May 1, 1881.]

DEUTERONOMY, 8:2 - And thou shalt remember all the way which the Lord thy God led thee.

We meet to-day to study history; and one question is: Has our past anything of interest, or of comfort, or of hope, for us? Have we ourselves been, in any beneficial sense, instruments of, or actors in, history, on any scale, larger or smaller? Has God done anything for us, as a congregation, or by us, which forms any part, however small, of the historic record; and have we occasion to rejoice to-day, and to thank God, and take courage? Or have we only to mourn that privileges have been accorded to be undervalued and neglected; opportunities to be unembraced; talents to be wasted, or left unused ?

This church has now filled out a quarter of a century; for though not formally organized till the month of September ensuing, it commenced its life of work and worship in the month of May, in the year 1856, and has steadily pursued it till this hour.

Its first leader in the work of gathering, stimulating, and organizing, was Rev. Lucius I. Root, a man of consecration, zeal, and energy; and a workman that needed not to be ashamed. We had hoped until two years since, that he would be with us on this occasion to assist us in remembering the way in which God has led us; but the Master called him away, just two years ago to-day, to the better employ and enjoyments of the upper field.

This was then, by emphasis, a church in the wilderness; for the forest hemmed it in on every aide. This ground on which we worship to-day, was overgrown with great trees; and even this ridge of land on which this edifice stands was but comparatively dry ground.

A city, called Lower Saginaw, had been surveyed here in 1836; but a city on a map does not always, in this then western land, involve churches; and none were organized for some years from that time. Roman Catholic missionaries had visited this Saginaw Valley as early as 1829; the first residents, after the Indians, being French people of that persuasion. Their first permanent work did not begin till 1850. The first Protestant service of a public nature was held in 1841, in "a little red school-house," now part of a dwelling at the foot of Washington street. The meeting was under the conduct of Hon. James G. Birney, an Elder in the Presbyterian church, and afterward twice a candidate for the Presidency of the United States-being supported by the "' Liberty, or Anti-Slavery, party." Mr. Birney continued the leadership of a religious service for a time.

A union church edifice was commenced in 1849, and was completed in 1853; and the Methodists having at the time more strength shall any other denomination in the place, the building became theirs, and is still used as the original part of their pleasant house of worship on Washington street.

The services of the Episcopal Church were commenced in 1850. The German Bethel Lutheran Church was organized in 1852. Thus our picture of the Presbyterian Church has these organizations in its foreground. Since 1856 we have several additional church organizations.

The original members of this church numbered eight, as follows: Albert Miller, Mary Ann Miller, Abigail Smith, Frances T. Root, Jesse Calkins, Angeline Miller, Mary E. Trombley, and Nancy M. Hart.

Of these persons, Albert Miller, Mary A. Miller, and Abigail Smith are still members of this church; Mrs. Nancy M. Hart and Angeline Miller are residents of this city, but have transferred their relations, the first to the Presbyterian Church of Minneapolis, Minn., and the second to the Congregational Church of this city.

During its twenty-five years the church has had two pastors, and one stated supply. Mr. Root was installed by the Presbytery of Saginaw in November, 1858, and resigned in February, 1860.

Rev. E. J. Stewart acted as stated supply from June, 1861, to December, 1863. During this time two houses of worship were built upon this ground; the first being burned during the first service held in it, and while the Communion was being administered, in December, 1861.

This building, or the original part of it, was built during the year 1863, and was dedicated in December of that year.

The present pastor commenced his work here May 1, 1865, and was installed by the Presbytery of Saginaw in November following.

Previous to the building of this edifice the church worshiped in the schoolhouse already mentioned, though not by themselves; afterward in the courthouse, and in B public hall on Water street; continuing this migratory and unsatisfactory sort of church life till the close of 1863.

The church grew, while it had a minister, from the beginning. In the first nine years of its life it had enrolled ninety-four members, of whom fifty six united upon profession of their faith. At the close of the nine years its members, as returned to the General Assembly, numbered eighty. Its resident membership was about forty.

During the sixteen years succeeding 1865, it has added three hundred and seventy-two, making a total of four hundred and sixty-six; of whom one hundred and forty-eight have been dismissed to other churches, and twenty-seven have deceased. At present there are connected with it three hundred and ten members. Of the members added in the past sixteen years, one hundred and seventy-nine have been added on profession of their faith. The largest number so adder in any one year was in 1876, being forty-one.

Two items in the above statement will challenge attention, viz.: The small number of deaths and the comparatively large number of dismissions. Twenty-seven deaths, out of four hundred and sixty-six persons, in sixteen years, would seem a singular statement indeed in an older community where the whole number might be taken in a single year. The explanation of the small death rate is doubtless found in two facts: first, that we live in a healthful climate; and second, that our church is largely made up of young persons. Twenty-one of these deaths have been of women. This will not seem so strange, when it is stated, that of the four hundred and sixty-six church members, three hundred and twenty-four are also women. If woman was first in the transgression, she is surely first in the return from it.

As to the dismissals, they are only a symptom. We scarcely realize the restlessness of our western populations. By western, I mean the European as well as the American people. I was surprised to find recently, while in Minnesota, that removals were the great obstacle to church growth and prosperity there - many of the churches there losing as many members in a year as they received. Restlessness is not a trouble in New England and the Middle States only, in our country. Migration is as common from western Texas, even, as in any part of the country. No part of Europe or America is in a settled condition. This need not disturb us, for God's great plans have been often wrought out by migrations, and the great evil of Oriental lands is stagnation.

I count over two hundred and eighty families, and single persons not attached to family here, who have worshipped with us, and been either workers in the church, or pew-holders, during our sixteen years, who have gone from us. As to such as have worshipped unknown, they have constantly constituted from one-fourth to one-third of the congregation. Those who have been here and gone are living far west and far east-in Canada, New York, California, Arizona, Texas, Minnesota, Washington, and Oregon Territories, or elsewhere.

What could more forcibly remind us that our whole life on earth is processional? We come and stay awhile, and then move on. and others step into our places continually, and we have little idea who is behind us; yet our successors are getting ready. Some of them are swimming kites and playing with dolls, or are possibly yet in their cradles; or possibly have got beyond all these, and are already reckoning these as the "childish things."

Yet let us not mistake in counting members who have left us as a loss, if, especially, their stay with us was of value. The use and aim of a church is to train a people for use, wherever they may be, or go. The aim is to infuse something of heaven into their souls, that they may reproduce and increase it, whenever they shall travel or sojourn; and carry it to heaven with them when they go. Our concern is, therefore, not so much how many we shall get and keep, but what we shall do for and with them while they stay.

Among our dismissals are twelve to the church of West Bay City, and fifteen to the Congregational Church of this city. Most of these, in each case, were to constitute the nucleus of those churches in their organization.

Eighteen persons have held the office of Ruling Elder in the church since its beginning, viz.: Albert Miller, Scott W. Sayles, Geo. E. Smith, B. B. Hart, Jas. L. Monroe, Jas. Remington, H. O. Tomar, Wm. A. Cathcart, Caleb Jewett. F. A. Bancroft, Jesse F. Romer, J. L. Dolsen, John Haynes, Wheeler L. Plum, Wm. H. Burr, Miles Ayrault, D. C. Smalley and Wm. A. Haines. Seven of these, viz.: Albert Miller, F. A. Bancroft, Jesse F. Romer, John L. Dolsen, Miles Ayrault, D. C. Smalley and Wm. C. Haines yet remain in office.

In May, 1871, the church adopted what is called the system of rotary or term eldership; the body of elders to consist of three classes; each class to serve for six years! and an election to take place in May of each alternate year.

Of Deacons the church has had three, viz.: Albert Miller, Leon Trombley and H. D. Tomar. Judge Miller is still in that office.

But a church takes its standing, not simply by what it seemingly is, but by what it does. In fact its doings determine what it is - "By their fruits ye shall know them," - and our Lord has said it is more blessed to give than to receive.

In its earlier life this church, like most of its neighbors in this and other States, was receiver. Home missionary aid was extended to it for for first eight or nine years of its existence - at least while it enjoyed the services of the gospel ministry. This house was built, originally, by assistance from abroad. It is, therefore, with satisfaction that we have been able to repay these sums many times over by aid given to other churches in a condition like ours in the early days of our weakness.

In the last sixteen years this congregation has contributed some $3,681 for foreign missions; $2,626 to home missions distinctively, and $7,862 to various missionary objects, or $14,159 in all, for missionary work. This is rather beneath than above the actual amount. The average is 1884 per annum for the sixteen years.

Sixteen years ago the church was in debt some $700. There has been expended in the way of additions to the building, or furniture and facilities, not far from an average of $1,000 per annum, for this same period. The Lecture and Sabbath-school room, in the rear of the church, was added in the year 1868; and in 1872 the two wines were built, by which the seating capacity of the building was increased about one-third. In 1875 the organ was purchased, and the old gallery, with a part of the vestibule, made into a niche, for its reception.

Of moneys contributed for missionary purposes, the range has included, during the past twelve years, all the objects presented by our General Assembly, viz.: Home and Foreign Missions, Sustentation, Publication, Church Erection, Ministerial Education, the Freedmen, and Ministerial Relief.

The Bay County Bible Society and the American Sunday-school Union, have also been steadily remembered. Nor has the cause of Sabbath Schools in the Saginaw valley, as a special work, been forgotten. In our earlier days, when the church was weaker than now, very considerable help was extended annually in this direction for a number of years. For a time it contributed 876, or more, per annum, in sustaining the agency of Rev. L. M. Hunt and others, in special Sabbath-school work in this vicinity.

It has also been our privilege to assist several neighboring churches in their beginning; some of them in the city and others beyond its limits Some six such churches occur to me at present.

The work done by the church has varied, both in amount and direction, with the varying years of its history, and according to the force at its command. At one period the Sabbath-school work was the leading feature with us. The Valley Association was sustained and made effective in the employ of an agency; then our young men took up the work of organizing and conducting, for a time, such schools, in the neighboring settlements, till a local interest could be awakened which should continue them. For two seasons such schools were sustained at Essexville, Kawkawlin, Salzburg, Southeastern Bay City, by Messrs. James Monroe, Bidwell, Kimball, Scotford, Plum, and Burr; while J. H. Monroe kept up a school, mostly unassisted, for some six years, four miles eastward upon the Tuscola road.

In 1870 the chapel, at Twenty-third street, was built at a cost of $1,500, and has been since enlarged and furnished at an expense of $600 more. In this building a Sabbath-school has been steadily maintained. A prayer meeting was also held there for about two years, by the young men of the church; all to the manifest advantage of that neighborhood and also to our own help.

At present the church has its two schools, which seem to be all that its working force can properly sustain. The whole number of persons connected with these schools is now about four hundred; the average attendance is not more than three fourths of that number.

During the earlier years of the church its prayer meetings depended very much upon the presence and leadership of its minister; the membership, as has always been the case, and is yet, being scattered over a good deal of territory. This dispersion of membership has always been a disadvantage to our social and evening meetings. Our city is large, territorially, by reason of the extent of ground required by our leading branches of business. For many years our prayer meetings have been steadily three per week. They were for some years, four per week.



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It does not fall in with the plan of a general survey of our quarter century to dwell long upon the facts belonging to the past year, yet some brief mention of a few leading ones may be required.

Our missionary contributions for the year have been: to Foreign Missions, $252.00; to Home Missions, $323.00; to other missionary causes, $311.00, with a subscription in hand for the same, of $250.00- in all, $1,136.00 to benevolence. The congregational expenses are $3,408.00.

Of the moneys collected for benevolence, $447.39 are the weekly gifts of the congregation from thirty-two known givers. The Ladies' Society's collections were $181.82, which Sum is divided between home and foreign missions. The Young Ladies' Band collected $40 for foreign missions. The Church Sabbath-school has collected $42 for the Alaska mission, and the Chapel School $12, divided between the home and foreign work.

Of special gifts, $100 has been paid to assist the young church at Carol The Ladies' Association leaving given us $20 to procure the Spiritual Songs for our evening worship, the chapel edition of Songs of the Sanctuary, some ten years in use, has been sent to the church to be organized at Pinconning.

My death-list for the year numbers eleven, including but two members of the church. Mrs. Huldah L. Bradley has but recently departed. Of her long residence here, and of her useful life of suffering, we have of late spoken and need not repeat. Though her connection with the church was but recent, she had long filled an important place among us, and the vacancy which her departure leaves is sadly felt.

Mr. O. El. P. Goodwin had been long a resident here. He was for a time a trustee of this congregation, and at the time of his death was an alderman of the city. His widow is one of the older members of this church.

Two loved members of our Church Sabbath-school have been taken from us, in the very bloom of their youth. I refer to Miss Ella Laing, aged twelve, and Master Eugene Lewis, aged fifteen. These persons were, each of them, conspicuous for their gentleness, docility, and amiable traits of character. They were favorite pupils of their respective teachers, and were loved of all who knew them. Their parents and friends have the sincerest sympathy of all their acquaintances.

Besides, there was an infant child of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Zundell, the latter a member of this church. There are also five young children on my list, whose parents are not identified with us.

We cannot soon forget that dire catastrophe, occurring immediately after our anniversary of last year, when a man in the prime of his life was cut off, as in a moment. I allude to the death of Mr. Alexander Falconer, at Pinconning, by falling under a moving railroad train; leaving a young widow with an infant child, together with a large circle of friends, to mourn his loss. Mr. Falconer was a man with large business interests his hands, and was trusted and respected among us. His coming here was but recent, but we had hoped much from his stay with us. His case is another illustration of the truth, that in the midst of life we are in death.

I had hoped, till within a few days, that one member of the church would be all requiring mention in this connection. But death is all but our guest to-day. His dark shadow is still hung over us, and the departure of one very dear to us is marked by the emblem of a broken life, occupying her accustomed seat to-day. Mrs. Susannah Hamet, a member of this church since 1861, has just left us As her departure is so recent, and I propose to speak of her more at length, I will only say now that we are sorely stricken in this removal. How could we be consoled, but for the confident hope for such as she, of a better life to come.

I have, perhaps, given enough of facts and figures. Nor do I propose to speak at length of needs or deficiencies: another occasion may do for that.

But I may be pardoned the statement that this church has not furnished, in its quarter century of life, a foreign missionary, nor a minister of the gospel at home. How much the pressure of business life, in this new region, with its natural material tendencies, may have to do with this fact, I cannot now stop to inquire. I know that ministers and missionaries, as a rule, are the more natural product of old and settled churches; and that they come, generally, of a godly ancestry. But they come too, by a spiritual necessity, of an immediate parental faith and prayer. When these rise high enough, they are found in new churches, and on the frontiers. Where there are Hannahs, there will also be Samuels.



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I knew that my thanks are of little value; but I give them partly in your name. And I trust and know that no well-meant effort escapes the Master's eye. It is He who once said, of the humble endeavor of a loving heart- "She hath done what she could."

I trust that this beautiful drapery surrounding us to-day, is both an emblem and a prophecy of the future prosperity of this church, and of the unfading flowers, and the ever eternal beauty of that land where we hope to be gathered without the sad reminder that death is abroad; but where

"Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood
Stand dressed in living green."

And now, brethren, I commend you to God, and the word of His grace, which is able to build you up and give you a place with them that are sanctified. AMEN.

THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL.
 

The evening exercises, which were the celebration of the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of the Sunday-school connected with the church, were opened with a voluntary by the choir, followed by prayer, a song by the school, and the secretary's report, which was as follows:

The early records of the school arc very defective. The school was organized with the commencement of Rev. Mr. Root's labors. Its superintendents prior to May, 1865, were as follows: Mr. Baldwin, S. W. Sayles Dr. Geo. E. Smith, P. S. Heisordt, and Jas. L. Monroe.

From May, 1865, the superintendents have been in the following order:

Messrs. Geo. W. Hotchkiss, James L. Monroe, J. H. Monroe, Caleb Jewett, Winsor Scofield, J. L. Monroe, and F. A. Bancroft. The longest terms of office were by Mr. J. L. Monroe and Mr. Bancroft. Mr. Monroe served five years and Mr. Bancroft seven.The time of holding the school has always been immediately after the morning church services.

The number belonging to the school has been as high as three hundred or more. 

The present number is about two hundred and sixty.A complete list is kept of the intermediate classes, teachers, and officers' but none of the two infant classes or three Bible classes. The present membership is made as follows:

Scholars in intermediate classes. 152
Scholars in infant class (estimated) 40
Scholars in adult class (estimated) 40
Teachers 21
Officers 8
Total membership 261

The number of classes in the school is twenty-four, one of which is an infant class, three are Bible classes, ad twenty-three intermediate classes.

ATTENDANCE

The aggregate attendance during the year was 6,491, and there having been forty-six sessions of the school, the average attendance was 141. This shows an increase of sixty-six in the aggregate and eleven in the average attendance. Commencing with the year, April 30, 1872, a complete table of attendance, showing the ups and downs of the school in that regard, has been prepared as follows:

Year Aggregate
Attendance
Sessions
1872 7,045 46
1873 6,536 46
1874 9,278 48
1875 7,987 50
1876 7,595 46
1877 8,055 46
1878 7,644 46
1879 7,200 47
1880 6,563 43
1881 6,497 46


THE FINANCES.

The financial report is as follows:

 

RECIEPTS.
 
Amount on hand at the beginning of the year $62.19
Amount of collections during the year $181.94
Total receipts $244.13


DISBURSEMENTS.
 

Paid for periodicals, balance on library, programmes, etc.  $194.97
Balance, April 30, 1881  $49.16
The present financial condition of the school is:   
Assets, cash on hand

$46 19

Liabilities, none.  


LIBRARY.


As to the library, there have been no additions made to it during the year, It will be necessary this year to get some new books, as the last were purchased in 1879. The librarians report that but one volume has been lost, and thirty-seven kept out longer than the rules allow, (two weeks).

The present condition as thus shown for the last year will give an idea of it from year to year.

The school has always enlisted the interest of the church at large and been attended by a considerable number of the members of the church, not only as teachers but as members of the Bible classes. The pastor's class teas varied from three to sixty, and at one time and another a goodly proportion of the church members have been in it. It has been lessened of late years by the organizational of a young ladies' and also a young gentlemen's class.

After this report had been road and adopted, and a song by the scholars, the school was addressed by Rev. Mr. Cooper of Detroit, and formerly of Saginaw, and Rev. Dr. Wight, and the exercises concluded with another song by the children.



ADDRESSES.

By Hon. Albert Miller.

Fifty years ago there were about one hundred inhabitants between the northern limits of Oakland County and the Straits of Mackinaw. At that time my residence was in the settlement of Grand Blanc, better known then by its French pronunciation, "straw Thaw," (Big White,) the name given by the French settlers of Detroit, on account of its having formerly been the place of residence of a big white savage. The settlement numbered, at the time referred to, about seventy-five souls, not more than half a dozen of whom had ever made a profession of religion; but notwithstanding that fact, it was a very quiet, orderly settlement,-violations of the Sabbath by hunting, fishing, and ordinary labor seldom occurring. The people were well satisfied with their location, and the idea generally prevailed that unless the Sabbath was respected the settlement would not prosper.

The first sermon I heard in Michigan was delivered by a Presiding Elder from the Ohio Conference. His name was Gilruth, a large, portly man, with all tile characteristics of an old-time Methodist minister. Thet was in 1831, and I think the first sermon preached in that settlement. In 1832 Charles and John Butler resided in the southern part of the Grand Blanc settlement {they had been connected with a Congregational Church in Western New York), and in the summer of that year the people gathered on Sabbath afternoons at the house of one of the brothers to hear a sermon read and prayer offered. In the summer of 1833, Rev. James F. Davison of the Methodist connection, preached occasionally in the settlement During that same summer a Congregational Church was organized, which was the first church organization between Pontiac and the Straits of Mackinaw. I attended the fortieth anniversary of its organization in 1873, where I met many of the old settlers, and some of the original members of the church. One of the latter was Capt. Charles Butler, then hale and hearty at eighty-five years of age. In 1825 Capt. Butler commanded the canal boat Seneca Chief, and conveyed Gov. Clinton and staff from Buffalo to New York, when the Erie Canal was formally opened and the ceremony performed at New York of mingling the waters of Lake Erie with those of the Atlantic. I have often heard him relate the circumstance and speak of the ovations at different points on the line of the canal, and of their splendid reception at New York. Capt. Butler died about a year ago, aged over ninety years.

In 1833 I removed from Genesee County to Saginaw, but I believe the first church organization after the one at Grand Blanc was a Congregational Church in 1836, at Mount Morris, six miles north of Flint The place was then called the Coldwater settlement, on account of the strict temperance principles of the people. About that time a Presbyterian Church was organized at Flint. The M. E. Church had a preaching station at Flint, but I believe no church organization till after the ones above referred to.

In the summer of 1833, the Ohio M. E. Conference attempted to establish a Missionary Station among the Indians at Saginaw, and also to furnish preaching for the white settlers at that point. They sent out a smart, young minister named Frazee, well educated, a fluent speaker, and who was fond of a good horse, as I believe most Methodist ministers are. Mr. Frazee met with a rasher cool reception among the Indians; the traders did not encourage them at all in the matter of having teachers among them, telling them that their business was hunting. not looking at papers, as they express the act of studying. At one time, after preaching on a Sabbath at a white settlement on the Tittabawassee, Mr. Frazee was inquired of as to his congregation. He said there were some women present, but the men he believed had all gone hunting. After visiting Saginaw once or twice, he found that the besetting sin of a portion of the people was selling whisky to the Indians, and on one occasion in his sermon he boldly denounced such practices, which caused as great an uproar in a small way, as Paul's preaching at Ephesus did; for like Demetrius and his followers they knew that " by this craft they had their wealth." During the night after the sermon, "certain lewd fellows of the baser sort" entered the stable where the minister's horse was kept, and sheared the hair from the animal's mane and tail. In passing through the country on his return, the horse displayed a prominent sign of the depravity of human nature. The next minister that came to the Saginaw Circuit was the Rev. Wm. H. Brockway, a young man particularly well adapted to his work, and subsequent years have shown him well adapted to other positions in life than a pioneer missionary. Mr. Brockway mingled freely with the people, assisting them in whatever labor they were engaged in. He would rebuke every sinful practice that came within his knowledge, in such a way as to give no offense, thereby gaining the respect of the people and doing much to check the evils of profanity, drunkenness, and Sabbath-breaking. Mr. Brockway was a good preacher and powerful in prayer. At the first meeting he held in a log schoolhouse on the bank of the Tittabawassee, in his prayer he made an earnest appeal for the outpouring of the Spirit, and a revival of God's work in that place. Some years afterwards, during a series of meetings held in that same old schoolhouse, there was a revival and many souls converted. A venerable lady, who has recently gone to her rest, always believed that the revival was in answer to Mr. Brockway's first prayer in that house. I recollect on an occasion of a quarterly meeting he preached in the "mess-house," attached to the American Fur Company's trading house, to a congregation of about twenty, not one of whom was a professor of religion, and the collection amounted to seventeen dollars. Mr. Brockway left Saginaw early in 1836, and his immediate successors did not fill his place. After the Indian title to the land in the vicinity of Saginaw had been extinguished, and before it was offered for sale by the U. S. government, the locality was visited by Dr. Charles Little of Avon. N. Y. He was greatly pleased with the country and had great faith in the future of the Saginaw Valley. Dr. Little made some choice selections of land in the vicinity of the fort, at Saginaw, and on his return to Detroit left money at the land office to purchase land when it should be offered for sale. The purchase was made by Dr. Little with a view of setting his family on the land when the proper time should arrive. When the great tide of emigration was setting in from the east, in 1836, Dr. Little's eldest son, Norman, with others, purchased the site of the village of Saginaw, with a view of expending large sums for the improvement of the town. With the contemplated improvements it was thought that in the near future Saginaw would be a pleasant place to reside in.

Rev. H. L. Miller, who married a daughter of Dr. Little's, came with his family in 1836, to reside permanently at Saginaw. There was a great accession to the population during that season, and in the fall a Presbyterian church was organized, which was presided over for the next two years by Mr. Miller as pastor, during which time a marked improvement was made in the religious and social status of the people.

In December, 1838, a series of meetings were held at, Saginaw by the Rev. O. Parker, under the auspices of the Presbyterian Church. There were a number of conversions and several accessions to the church at tile next communion season. Among the number were the late Dr. George Davis and wife, myself, wife, and wife's sister. Rev. A. C. Foote preached for the church during that winter. There were times when the church was without a minister, but when there was no preaching, worship was kept up by reading a sermon on the Sabbath, and I believe the Sunday-school was a live institution from its organization. Rev. Harvey Hyde supplied the church in 1842 and 1843 or thereabout. He wee a strong Congregationalist and prevailed on the younger members of the church to change its government and connection from Presbyterian to Congregational. I well remember that Hiram L. Miller, who was present when the vote was taken, refused to unite with the new organization, and stated that he felt that it would be his duty to organize a Presbyterian church as soon as one could be sustained. The church remained in the Congregational connection for a time, but did not prosper much. In the fall of 1848 the late Rev. Louis Mills was engaged by the church for one year as stated supply. About the same time I took another move away from church and social privileges-coming to Portsmouth to reside, when there were only four or five families within a mile of us. There were a few families living then at Lower Saginaw who had so far advanced in civilization as to build a small school-house about twenty feet square, which, 1 believe. now stands connected with another building near the corner of First and Washington streets. A successful mission among the Indians had been established, and as a result, many Indians were converted from heathenism to Christianity. I recollect an incident in my travels in 1846, while far up the Tittabawassee looking for pine land. I had started from my camp at daylight, and while paddling my canoe down the river, about sunrise, my ears were greeted with music, and I was never more charmed by its sound than while listening to a familiar hymn tune sung in the wilderness by of Indians at their morning devotions. The Rev. Mr. Brown, the Methodist missionary at Kawkawlin, preached occasionally in the little school-house at Lower Saginaw, when the people of Portsmouth had the privilege of attending religious worship by walking two or three miles over a rough road, which privilege some of them almost invariably availed themselves of. The first church that was built in the valley and dedicated to the worship of God was the missionary church at Kawkawlin.

In 1850 and 1851 the firm of "Russell, Miller & Crowl" were engaged in the lumber business at Portsmouth, employing a number of men, many of whom had temporary residences for their families. The resident members of the firm desiring some religious privileges for their families and for those in their employ, in the fall of 1850, hired Rev. B. N. Paine, a young man belonging to the Wesleyan Methodist connection to come to Portsmouth and preach. His first sermon was delivered in the cabin of a propeller that had come to that point for lumber. Soon afterwards a rough building, twenty by thirty feet on the ground, was erected and formally dedicated to the worship of God. The building was afterwards enlarged and improved for a schoolhouse, and was used for school and religious purposes till the new school-house (the one that was burned) and the Baptist church were built. Mr. Paine d id not remain long at Portsmouth, and after he left, the house above referred to was open for all denominations to preach in, and was f or some years a regular preaching station for the Methodists. During the revival of 1857-8 it was the scene of many rich spiritual blessings. In the spring of 1851 I was staying over night at the Northern Hotel at Flint, where the office of the Flint and Saginaw stage was kept. In the evening a very fine looking young man came in and engaged a passage for the nest day to Saginaw, saying he would be found at Mr. Atterbury's, the Presbyterian clergyman. At that time tri-weekly stages were able to do all the passenger business between Saginaw and the outside world. The plank road was not completed and a passage from Flint to Saginaw was anything but pleasant; and it was a wonder to some of his fellow passengers what should call the young man to Saginaw at that time when the roads were so bad. It was suggested to him on the way that there mast be some female attraction at Saginaw. I afterwards became acquainted with the young man (who was none other than the Rev. D. M. Cooper), and knew him long as the beloved pastor of the Presbyterian church at Saginaw. Soon after Mr. Cooper's settlement the church at Saginaw was changed from Congregational to Presbyterian; a church building was erected and the church enjoyed general prosperity during his pastorale. In 1855 the population of Lower Saginaw and Portsmouth had increased so much that it was thought advisable to make a move towards hiring a Presbyterian minister to locate at Lower Saginaw. A subscription paper was circulated and three hundred dollars was subscribed towards supporting a minister for one year, expecting the Home Missionary Society would pay the balance of a necessary salary. The late Mr. William Jennison, father of Charles E. Jennison, was the prime mover in starting the subscription. One or two parties had looked the ground over in 1855, but no one had accepted the proposition of the people. In the spring of 1806, while at East Saginaw on business, I was introduced to the Rev. L. I. Root, who had been invited to visit that town with a view of organizing a church. In conversation with Mr. Root, I learned that he could not entertain the proposition of the people of East Saginaw for a moment, the people there desiring a Congregational church, and he could only work in Presbyterian harness. I invited him to Lower Saginaw to look over the ground there. In a day or two he came, accompanied by Mr. Cooper. After weighing the matter carefully and prayerfully, he determined to come; and about the first of May, 1866, he arrived with his family, and commenced his labors by gathering a congregation, preaching the gospel, visiting the people, organizing a Sunday-school, and performing all other duties that a pious, active, energetic man could, to promote the cause of Christ and build up a Presbyterian church in this place.

The dispensation of Providence, which has so recently called from earth a beloved member of our church, one who has for so many years participated in all our church festivals, and who was always active in making preparations for them, and in performing all other duties that would promote the interests of the church, or add to the pleasures of its membership, and one who anticipated great delight in participating in the pleasures and duties of this occasion, expecting to meet Mr. Cooper, a beloved pastor of former days, reminds me forcibly of a circumstance in the early history of this church which may be appropriate to relate at this time.

Near twenty years ago, when this church worshiped in the court-room (which was over a store on Water street), at a time when there was no excitement and no especial religious interest manifested, a young lady came before the session to be examined for admission to church membership. She made a good profession of her faith in Christ, and gave good reasons for her hope of salvation. The circumstance cheered the hearts of the members of the session, and the remark was made at the time that a young lady who had force of character and determination enough to confess Christ under such circumstances would be likely to maintain a sterling Christian character. The young lady disappeared from our midst a short time afterwards, but returned again as Mrs. Oscar F. Hamet, and all who have known her since, will testify to the correctness of the prediction made at the time the young lady united with the church.



By Hon. N. B. Bradley.


We have met to-day to commemorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the existence of this society. Twenty-five years ago to-day was organized the First Presbyterian Church of what was then Lower Saginaw. It is both right and a duty that we should thus assemble ourselves together to commemorate an event which has been crowned with so many and such rich blessings, and to rejoice that there is so much in our present position to encourage us in our future labors, in the Master's service. The little band of devoted Christians who originally composed the society consisted of only eight persons It has now grown into a strong, and vigorous, and self-sustaining congregation As the result of that organization, which for a long time met for worship i an exceedingly primitive building almost literally in the woods, we have a congregation strong in numbers. devoted in purpose, and united in action. Now for the first time ID our history, we close this twenty-fifth year of our existence, not only out of debt, but even with a surplus in the hands of our treasurer.

But we ought not to be content with this gratifying condition of our affairs, even financially, much less morally and spiritually, many reasons as we have for encouragement. We are here as citizens, as well as members of this congregation, and what better time than now, under the pleasant and favorable auspices by which we are surrounded, to take the preliminary steps for the gradual creation of a fund for the erection of a new and more commodious church edifice, and thus to show our gratitude to the Author of the many blessings that have been showered upon us during the quarter of a century of our existence as a church organization, and at the same time provide for a steadily growing necessity for better and larger facilities for usefulness? The time is soon coming when we shall not only need, but must have, a new and more convenient, as well as a larger church building.

This, it seems to me, is one of the duties that presents itself for our earnest consideration. It is one, too, that we should prepare to meet with willing and cheerful hearts. There are, of course, other duties and responsibilities daily presenting themselves. Upon the way we discharge the first, and sustain our part under the others, our religious as well as our financial success depends. We are all enlisted in a common purpose, and have an equal interest in the continued success of the cause to which we are devoted and our church dedicated. Upon this subject you will pardon me for the suggestion whether we make the pecuniary sacrifice we conveniently might towards the various religious objects which constitute the avowed and appropriate work of the church, and in which we are all thus equally interested. Do we all contribute as liberally as we might, or in proportion to our ability and as God has blessed us? Only recently I have read an account of a Presbyterian congregation in a small village in Iowa raising $15,000 for a church edifice. It is an example that should stimulate us to renewed efforts in the same direction.

As individual incidents, in the aggregate, make about all there is of our history, and as personal reminiscences may therefore be still in order in the review which the occasion naturally suggests, I trust I may properly so far digress from the line of remarks I have indulged in as to refer briefly to the circumstances under which I became connected with this church.

Before I came to Bay City I was a member of the Methodist Church, and it was my purpose to continue my church relations with that denomination But the circumstances to which I will refer over-ruled my intentions, and rendered it personally desirable that I should associate myself with this church and thus become one of you. I at first occasionally attended here as the most convenient place of worship, but with no intention of permanently uniting with any Presbyterian Church. Gradually, however, and almost imperceptibly, I began to sympathize with you, till finally I formed so strong an attachment for the church that I have not been disposed to sever my pleasant relations with you.

But perhaps a stronger reason for my being still n member of this church is due to an event which at that time was naturally looked upon as a serious and almost an irreparable misfortune. I mean the burning of the first church edifice erected by the society, and only the next Sabbath after it was dedicated

This calamity enlisted all my sympathies, and I resolved within my own mind, without consulting any one, to do what lay in my power to remedy your great misfortune. With this purpose ill view, I drew up a subscription paper and started out the very next day ml a canvass of the town to solicit subscriptions towards rebuilding the church, confining my efforts to the upper portion of the town. I met with such a cordial response to my appeals that in very short time I had raised about seven hundred dollars.

While still prosecuting the canvass I met P. S. Heisordt and Jas. L. Monroe, Esqs., who, it seemed, had started out Upon their own impulse, as I had upon mine, upon the same mission. They had secured almost the same amount of subscription that I had. I handed my subscription paper over to them and they continued their labors until a sufficient amount was subscribed to rebuild the church. Work was therefore begun upon it immediately, and the main body of this building was erected without unnecessary delay. It was used for worship until it became too small for the necessities of the con-gregation, when the two wings were added.

Such, in brief, was the motive which induced me to cast in my lot with you, and such is my recollection of an incident which had so much influence in producing that result.



By Rev. D. M. Cooper.

As an introduction to what I have to say on this occasion allow me a personal allusion.

My father was born in Montreal, in the year 1789; thence, a boy of ten years of age, he came to the city of Detroit, where he died in 1876, having been a resident of that city for seventy-six years.

My grandfather, on my mother's side, Col. Stephen Mack, was the first

Yankee merchant who pushed his way so far west of Buffalo as Detroit. He arrived there in the year 1807, and entered into partnership with Thomas Emerson, father of the late Curtis Emerson, a name quite familiar in the Saginaw Valley. "Mack & Emerson" was a firm well known throughout the northwest, and did an extensive business.

Col. Mack was a man of wonderful enterprise and sagacity. He quickly detected the possibilities of development that lay hidden in this Lower Penin-sula, and, with an eye even then to the opening up of this very Saginaw Val-ley, he organized an association composed of such men as William Woodbridge, Solomon Sibley, John L. Whiting, Austin Wing Wing, David C. McInstry and Alexander Macomb, and as their agent opened the old turnpike of Pontiac, which was subsequently continued to this point, and laid out the present city of that name.

He early predicted the commercial importance of this region, and but for the untimely death which cut him off in the prime of life, he might have had an honorable place among your pioneers.

I only make this personal allusion to show that I am a citizen of the State of Michigan, " to the manor born," and cannot but feel an interest in every- thing that relates to her material and moral welfare.

In view of this historical and biographical reminiscence, it seems to me now, as I look back upon it, the most natural thing in the world to find myself, the grandson, in the year 1851 as if under a propulsion from the spirit of the sire, heading towards Saginaw, to him the land of such promise. On the evening of my licensure by Detroit Presbytery, Rev. Calvin Clark (of blessed memory) asked me if I had ever thought of becoming a foreign mission-ary. I replied it had sometimes occurred to me. " Well ! " said he, "I want you to go right up among the heathen at Saginaw." Closely following upon this, I received earnest letters from Saginaw friends inviting me to visit them, which invitation I persistently declined, feeling unfit for the work, and desirous also of further prosecuting my studies under the supervision of Rev. Dr. Duffield. But finding myself shortly after, supplying the pulpit of Rev. Mr. Atterbury at Flint, I concluded to visit Saginaw City, and spy out the land. So I pushed on through sloughs of mud and over " corduroys " in a lumber wagon stage without springs, the wearisomeness of the way being somewhat alleviated by an occasional chat with Mr. Albert Miller who rode along side on horseback, as he stated to you in his own interesting paper.

While it is true I found some "heathen" in Saginaw whose heathenish proclivities I will not stop to detail, I found also a godly seed. The Presbyterian church, organized by Rev. H. L. Miller, in 1837, unable to maintain distinctive service, had merged itself into a miscellaneous congregation who were accustomed to meet in the only finished room of the present Court House, uniting with them in tile support of any minister of any denomination who proved himself acceptable. At the time of my arrival, it happened to be an Episcopalian clergyman of the name of Adderly who was officiating. Unfortunately he had been guilty of a grave misdemeanor, and upon his refusing to make a public acknowledgment of the same, those who composed the original Presbyterian church withdrew and assembled for worship in the old schoolhouse near by.

It was this little handful of people who had extended me the invitation to visit them, and which, as before said, I had declined because I was anxious still to prosecute my studies. I recall the names of Hiram L. Miller and Adaline his wife; Albert Miller and wife, now members of your own church; Dr. George Davis and wife (both dead), and Mrs. Woodruff, whom many will remember in connection with the old "Webster House." Mrs. Woodruff was sister to Rev. Dr. Leonard Bacon, of New Haven. She was a woman of noble physique, of indomitable will, and partaker of many of the characteristics of her distinguished brother. She also is dead.

I found in connection with this church, ten resident members. of which number only three were males. A subscription for the erection of a church edifice was already in existence amounting to $1,200, with the promise from the citizens of a bell in case theirs was the first church edifice erected in the place.

They seemed importunate to have me remain with them. I considered. The subscription, unless speedily secured, would vanish away. They promised to put up the building themselves without burdening me with any of the responsibility. There was no church of our denomination nearer than Flint, to which the Rev. Dr. Atterbury, now of Detroit, was ministering. It seemed difficult to find another man, and so I consented to stand in the breach. As I look back it seems presumptuous for me, so young and inexperienced and in every way so poorly equipped, to have undertaken the pastorale of a church upon the outskirts of civilization as Saginaw was at that day, for I now realize that it requires ripe experience to lay foundations. My only excuse was the importunity of the little organization and the consideration that my shortcomings would be so well supplemented by the ability and experience of that honored servant in the house of God, Hon. H. L. Miller, who is still among us, to bear testimony to Christ. You will pardon I know, this digression to honor one to whom and to his efficient wife as well, the Presbyterian churches in this whole valley owe a debt of gratitude for pioneer services that they cannot well repay.

And if again you are tempted to remark that I am turning this more into an anniversary of the church at Saginaw City than your own, you will remember how closely linked your own history is with that as the hive from which swarmed the other churches in the vicinity of kindred faiths; and also you will remember that you invited me here to relate, I suppose, what reminiscences were personal to myself.

It was greatly to our discouragement, however, that just as our little church began to gird itself for the building of our edifice, the founding of East Saginaw drew away from the congregation and town many of our best workers.

Nevertheless, I resolved to follow them with the ministrations of the gospel, and accordingly, commenced a regular afternoon service in the new settlement; crossing over the riser in the primitive "dug-out." With the exception of Rev. Mr. Adderly, who left this region shortly after my coming, I was the first minister that preached in East Saginaw, and my first service was held in the upper chamber of an unfinished tenement.

The growth of East Saginaw, largely due to the enterprise of the late Norman Little, was marvelous. As a necessary consequence the congregation grew rapidly and soon found themselves occupying a room in the newly built school-house. After serving them for a year and a half, I found the task too much for my strength, and looking around for a suitable man for the position, my attention was called to Rev. L. I. Root, with whom I was intimately acquainted in Princeton Theological Seminary. He came on at my request? but after a survey of the whole field, concluded to cast in his lot with the people of Lower Saginaw, and so became the organizer of your church, and its first pastor. I participated in his installation, Nov. 17, 1858. There were present on the occasion beside myself, Rev. H. H. Northrup, Rev. W. (1. Smith, and Rev. D. B. Campbell. Mr. Northrup preached the sermon, text, 1 Cor. 2: 2. Rev. D. M. Cooper gave the charge to the pastor, and Rev. W. a. Smith to the people. Mr. Root was a man of superior scholarship, of devoted piety, of pleasing address, and of fine ability. We all felt that in losing him the infant organization lost a true and able man; and also that in leaving when he did, he lost a chance of accomplishing here a life-work which does not often occur to any man. Nevertheless he continued on in his Master's work elsewhere, faithful to the end, and has entered into his rest.

Disappointed in Mr. Root, so far as East Saginaw was concerned, I secured the services of Rev. W. C. Smith. While the congregation which I had gathered was under my supervision, I sought in every honorable way to mold it into the Presbyterian form-anxious to have the three churches on the river of the same ecclesiastical connection. But at that time it so happened that a fierce conflict was going on between the New School Presbyterians and the Congregationalists, in which your present pastor, then resident at Chicago, was participating with his usual vigor. The New York Independent, just started, was on the war path. Everybody was taking sides. The small Presbyterian element in the congregation had, previous to coming to East Saginaw, resided within the bounds of the Detroit Presbytery, and had taken offense at some disciplinary act of theirs, in which Rev. Dr. Duffield had been somewhat prominent; and so, when a vote was taken as to what the character of their church polity should be, they acted almost solidly with the Congregationalists. Finding myself and the insignificant faction ill sympathy with me, in a hopeless minority, I gave over the contest. Such was the status of the church when Mr. Smith appeared upon the ground. In ecclesiastical sympathy and connection he was a decided Presbyterian, but as an honorable man he acted in full sympathy with the expressed will of the majority. Under his pastorate the congregation was organized as a Congregational Church and received into the General Association of Michigan. To his eight years of faithful work the Congregational Church of East Saginaw largely owe what they are to-day. He was a man of genial disposition, a good pastor and an excellent sermonizer-a man consecrated and unselfish. At a time when everybody was speculating in "corner lots" and laying the foundation of future fortunes, he steadfastly resisted the temptation to embark in the race for riches. He sought first the Kingdom of God and now all other things are added to him. He died in peace at Urbana, Ill., with the harness on. We were as intimate as brothers, and it gives me great pleasure to pay this tribute to his memory.

Not only was the Saginaw City Church the hive whence swarmed the Presbyterian Church of Bay City and the Congregational Church at East Saginaw but it sheltered for a time some Baptist bees, with whose lively buzzing you are quite familiar. I assure you they were not expelled because they were drones-far from it. I had no warmer friends or more energetic workers than the dear Fraser family. While with us your Mrs. Dennison and Mrs. McEwen and Mrs. McMasters were as interested and as earnest as though they had no denominational preferences whatever, and it may not be amiss to say that, during the awakening of 1858, it was a common thing to see along the group that bowed in prayer in my study on Monday evenings, the rugged forth and genial face of the late James Fraser. Though he never made an open profession of religion, I cannot but feel that the savor of that blessed revival followed him to the end.

In 1851 when I came to the valley the whole population of Saginaw County amounted to 2,690. The population at the present time, including Bay county which was cut off from Saginaw county in 1860, is 100,000.

Saginaw City contained about four hundred inhabitants. At East Saginaw, they were cutting down the heavy forest, laying the foundation for a large hotel called the Irving House, arid opening a road to intersect the old turn-pike at Cass River All there was at Lower Saginaw, were a few houses stretched along the shore; among which I remember the residence of Hon. James G. Birney, then prominent as its leader of the Liberty party in the United States. I well remember a pleasant afternoon spent in his house. With his character and public services we are all familiar.

In the year 1859 after eight years of delightful ministerial work I was compelled in consequence of failing health to leave my church and the valley. I left reluctantly arid never since have I turned my steps thitherward without feeling that 1 am traveling homewards, although the old familiar faces are displaced by new and strange ones, with here and there a precious exception.



LIST OF MEMBERS
EXPLANATION OF CHARACTERS USED - * Dismissed. "P."-Received on Profession. "L."-Received by Letter. Year-Date of Admission.

Original Members, Sept. 1856
Albert Miller, Mary Ann Miller, Abigail Smith, Francis T. Root*, Jesse Calkins*, Angeline Miller*, Mary E, Trombley, Nancy M. Hart*

Present List, July, 1881

Affleck John

P.

1875

Affleck Harriet

P.

1875

Alard Seaver

L.

1880

Atkinson Mary

L.

1871

Ayrault , Miles

L.

1877

Ayrault Mary

L.

1877

Ayrault, John

L.

1877

Bancroft, F. A. .

L.

1866

Bancroft, Felicia H.

L.

1862

Barnett, Marionette A

L.

1879

Bassett, Mary J.

P.

1874

Bialy, Mendal J. .

P.

1877

Bialy, Elizabeth

P.

1877

Bialy, Lucretia

P.

1877

Bialy,Carrie A.

P.

1877

Bonnell Sarah P.

L.

1876

Braddock Anna C.

L.

1858

Braddock, Mary A.

P.

1865

Bradley, Nathan B.

L.

1880

Bradlev Huldah Lena

L.

1880

Bradley Lizzie C.

L.

1880

Briscoe, R. J.

P.

1878

Briscoe, Sarah L.

L.

1878

Brown, Martha E.

P.

1879

Buck, Alma C.

P.

1873

Burke, Margaret

P.

1880

Burton, Ida B.

P.

1876

Cameron, Mary

P.

1872

Cameron, John R.

P.

1872

Capell, H. L.

P.

1878

Case, Dudley W.

L.

1873

Carpenter, Harriet M.

P.

1864

Cathcart, Wm. A.

L.

1867

Cathcart, Laura

L.

1867

Cathcart, Sarah E.

P.

1867

Cathcart, Mary L.

P.

1870

Chapin, Henry

L.

1874

Chapin Anna M.

P.

1879

Chatfieild, Clarence B.

P.

1877

Chatfield, Charlotte P.

L.

1879

Chron, Mary J.

P.

1869

Clements Ada

P.

1870

Clements Luella A.

P.

1877

Clark, L. L. .

L.

1881

Cobb, Geo. P.

L.

1869

Cobb, Mrs. Laura

P.

1880

Collins, Sarah J.

L.

1871

Collins, Ann Eliza

P.

1880

Cooke, Julia W.

L.

1867

Conway Hannah

P.

1869

Chesbro Matilda W.

P.

1879

Cottrell, Elizabeth .

P.

1858

Craig, Elizabeth

P.

1869

Craig, Mary

P.

1870

Crawford, Wm. H

L.

1879

Crawford, Cornelia M.

L.

1879

Crawford, Mattie B.

L.

1879

Delzell Thos.

P.

1862

De Graw Margaret

P.

1864

De Graw Amelia A.

P.

1877

Daglish, Matilda E

L.

1871

Dolsen, John I,.

L.

1870

Dolsen. Ann E

L.

1868

Dolsen, Matilda

P.

1872

Dolsen, Fannie McRae

P.

1876

Dougherty, Isabella

L.

1880

Dougherty, Adaline

L.

1880

Dunham, M.J.

L.

1865

Evans John A. D

P.

1876

Evans Henrietta M.

P.

1878

Evans, Eliz. McKee

P.

1878

Ferris, Annie .

L.

1875

Ferris. Mrs. Augusta

L.

1879

Fleck, W. N.

P.

1877

Flower, Seldin A.

P.

1871

Flower, Margaretta

P.

1871

Gaines Nellie .

L.

1876

Gates, Mary L.

L.

1865

Goodwin, Arathema

P.

1860

Gordon, Henry

P.

1864

Grant, Margaret E.

P.

1877

Gray, Anna M.

P.

1876

Green Frances E.

P.

1877

Gilchrist, Eliz.

L.

1869

Guinep, Harriet A.

P.

1870

Haines, Jessie E.

L.

1879

Haines, Lizzie T.

L.

1879

Haines, Wm. C.

L.

1879

Haines, Mary C.

L.

1879

Haines, Martha B

L.

1879

Hall, Emily A.

P.

1876

Hall, Charlotte

P.

1870

Harrington, Wm. H.

L.

1872

Hartley, Mary E.

L.

1872

Hawley, Chas. R.

L.

1866

Hill, Isaac H.

L.

1864

Hill Mrs. I. H.

L.

1864

Hull, Mary J.

L.

1873

Heisordt, Peter S.

L.

1865

Heisordt, Lodema

L.

1866

Heisordt, Frederic

P.

1876

Hotchkiss. Julia A.

L.

1871

Hovey W. T.

L.

1877

Hudson, Eva M.

P.

1877

Hutcheson, Nellie

P.

1865

Johnson, Ferdinand .

P.

1875

Johnson, Sarah A

L.

1869

Johnson, Sarah L.

L.

1866

Kent, Elvira

L.

1861

Kent, Rebecca

L.

1861

Kent, Orlo T.

P.

1876

King , Henry W.

P.

1868

Kinney, Eliz.

L.

1876

Knight Harriet

P.

1862

Lewis, C. E.

P.

1861

Lewis, Kittie A. .

P.

1877

Love, Anna I,.

L.

1870

Love, Wm. B

P.

1876

Love, Alice D.

P.

1876

Lindsay, Ellen

P.

1877

Loomis Helen B.

L.

1877

McEwan Margaret

P.

1868

McCormick, Hattie

P.

1877

McPherson Harriet

L.

1867

McPherson Adam J

P.

1873

McMath, John W.

L.

1868

McMath, Ella J.

L.

1868

McRae, Donald

L.

1873

McRae, Mary

L.

1873

McBae, Forbes

P.

1879

McRae, Mrs. Helen

L.

1879

McDonald, Christie

P.

1876

McDonald, Jane .

P.

1876

McDonald, Donald

P.

1876

McDonald. Mary

P.

1876

McFarland, Peter

L.

1879

McFarland, Jeannette

L.

1879

McCready, Margarette

L.

1876

MeLennan, Andrew

P.

1876

McIntosh, Agnes

P.

1876

McIntosh, Minnie

P.

1876

McIntosh, Jane

P.

1876

McIntosh. Mary

P.

1877

McLaren, Daniel

P.

1877

McLaren Martha

P.

1877

McLaren, Berthea.P.

P.

1877

McKinnon Donald.

P.

1877

cDonald, Mary

P.

1870

McLane Jennie

L.

1872

McEwan , Flora

L.

1878

McEahren, Sarah A.

L.

1879

Mackintosh Eliza H.

P.

1879

Marlatte, Paul

L.

1876

Marlatte, Ellen

L.

1876

Marshall, Eliz.

P.

1875

Maxwell, Sarah

L.

1858

Maxwell Jennie

P.

1876

Martson Emily

P.

1867

Meritt, Minerva

L.

1869

Meritheu, Eliza A,

P.

1877

Mason Elizabeth.

P.

1870

Martin Attie

L.

1880

Milne Geo.

L.

1863

Miller Albert

P.

1877

Miller, Mary Ann

L.

1856

Miller, Mary A. O.

P.

1865

Mitchell, John

L.

1873

Monroe Julia H.

L.

1871

Moran Alzina

P.

1878

Morley, Ira W

P.

1880

Morrison, Wm.

P.

1873

Morrison, Leonora

L.

1873

Morrison Alex

P.

1877

Morrison Elizabeth

P.

1877

Mitchell, Mary B.

P.

1876

Mitchell Peter

L.

1863

Mitchell Mary P

L.

1863

Munro, Margaretta

P.

1869

Mullen, Thomas

L.

1877

Myers, Adaline A

1869

Myers, Agnes J.

P.

1878

Norrington, Henry H.

P.

1868

Oliver, John

L.

1876

Oliver, Ann

L.

1876

Oliver, Sarah

P.

1879

Orton, Harriet S.

L.

1874

Park, Theresa . .

P.

1870

Park, Bernice .

P.

1870

Pomeroy, Mary L.

L.

1866

Plush, Carrie . .

1874

Porter, Chas. B.

L.

1880

Porter, Abigail

L.

1880

Potter, Clara A.

L.

1880

Pratt, Bessie

L.

1857

Pratt, Noah C.

L.

1870

Pratt, Eliza M.

L.

1870

Pratt, Robt. S.

P.

1868

Pratt, Mary

P.

1862

Pratt, Ella (,.

L.

1870

Pratt, Frank S.

L.

1870

Pressley, Matilda.

P.

1858

Pond Caroline

L.

1867

Randall Addle A.

P.

1875

Reid, Carrie.

L.

1873

Richardson, Ida B.

P.

1876

Richardson Janet

P.

1870

Rider E W

L.

1878

Rider, Ida B.

L.

1878

Roberts Mary

L.

1880

Rogers, Maria E.

1873

Robbins, Cynthia

L.

1868

Romer, Jessie F.

L.

1869

Romer, Lucy A.

L.

1869

Reilly, Cornelia

L.

1864

Savage Isabella

P.

1874

Scofield, Winsor

L.

1868

Scofield, Augusta H.

P.

1868

Scofield Ida H

P.

1876

See, Eliza

P.

1876

See, James A. .

P.

1876

Simpson, Wm.

P.

1876

Simpson, Jeannette

P.

1875

Simpson, Jeannette, Jr.

P.

1876

St John, Mary

L.

1866

Shearer, M. J.

P.

1865

Smith Geo. E.

P.

1868

Smith, Abigail

;

1856

Smith, Frankie

P.

1876

Smith, Isaac N.

P.

1878

Smith Anna

L.

1878

Smith, Mary S.

P.

1872

Smalley, Darwin C.

L.

1871

Smalley Martha

L.

1871

Smalley Helen B

P.

1873

Smalley, Margaret

L.

1876

Simms Henry

L.

1874

Spear, Eli A. .

L.

1877

Spear, Sarah B

L.

1877

Spear, Fred. L.

P.

1877

Speir, Agnes

P.

1870

Speir Mary .

P.

1872

Stanton, Mary C.

L.

1869

Stewart Anna O.

P.

1876

Stone, Wm. H.

P.L.

1880

Stone, Elvy

L.

1880

Stryker, C.

L.

1870

Sullivan, Ellen E.

P.

1865

Till, Caroline M.

L.

1874

Trusdell Hugh

P.

1874

Trusdell May B

P.

1875

Tupper, E. T.

L.

1872

Valentine, Albert J. .

P.

1864

Vincent, Catherine.

P.

1869

Vincent, Mary J.

P.

1869

Vincent, Mary.

P.

1869

Vincent, Sarah A.

P.

1869

Wands, W. W.

L.

1873

Wands, Ella

L.

1873

Wands Frank L

L.

1878

Wands Millie R.

L.

1878

Ward, James S.

L.

1864

Ward, Mrs. J. S.

P.

1862

Warren, Anne

L.

1880

Watrous, Henry R.

L.

1876

Watrous, Bettie N.

L.

1876

Webber, Nancy M.

L.

1870

Wetherell, J. P.

P.

1858

Wetherell, Antoinette.

P.

1858

Wight, Caroline E.

L.

1865

Wight, Sophia.

P.

1870

Willson, W. R.

L.

1868

Whittemore, Jennie

P.

1876

Whitney. Kate

L.

1874

Zundell, Emma V.

P.

1875

MEMBERS DISMISSED

Adams, Maria .

L.

1871

Angell, E. C. .

P.

1861

Baillie, Isabella .

L.

1879

Baillie, Robena.......

L.

1879

Bebee, Abigail

L.

1857

Bedell, Frances E.

L.

1869

Beers, Stephen E

L.

1870

Beers, Mary

L.

1870

Benedict, G. E

L.

1863

Berry James

P.

1862

Berry, Mary

P.

1862

Bradley, John S.

L.

1869

Bradley, Lucy.J.

L.

1869

Bidwell,John E.

L.

1867

Bishop, Thos. P

P.

1867

Bishop, Julia A. M.

P.

1870

Blackman, Ida

L.

1870

Blackman, Geo. W.

L.

1873

Blodgett, Sarah E.

L.

1872

Buchanan, S. A.

L.

1872

Buchanan, Sarah E

L.

1872

Burr, Wm. H.

L.

1867

Brewster, Robt. E.

P.

1865

Calkins, Jesse .

L.

1856

Cathcart Homer

P.

1872

Cathcart, Lucy A.

L.

1872

Carey, Flora .

P.

1874

Cooper, Thos. S.

L.

1871

Cooper, Martha J.

L.

1871

De Lisle, Wm. H.

L.

1868

De Lisle, Sarah

L.

1868

De Lisle, Frederica

P.

1870

De Lisle, Theodora

P.

1870

Eaton, Frances M.

P.

1866

Eaton Mrs. S.

P.

1870

Eaton Mary E.

P.

1870

Easton, Anna

P.

1876

Eggleston Mary

L.

1873

Freeman, Chester H.

L.

1870

Gaines, John

L.

1876

Gaines, Mary

L.

1876

Gibb, Matthew

L.

1875

Gibb, Margaret

L.

1875

Gile, Ellen M

L.

1873

Green, Robt.

P.

1863

Green, Sarah

L.

1863

Harry, Chas. L. .

P.

1876

Harry, Clara J.

P.

1876

Hart, Barzillai B.

P.

1858

Hart, Eliza

P.

1857

Haynes John

L.

1873

Haynes Willis J.

P.

1873

Henion Burt G.

L.

1873

Henion Laurens T.

L.

1873

Hogan, Clara.

P.

1870

Hogle, J. S.

L.

1874

Hood, Geo. F.

L.

1874

Hood, Mary

L.

1874

Hooper, Joseph.

L.

1863

Hovey, Carrie R.

P.

1877

Hubbard, Grace D

P.

1876

Hotchkiss, Geo. NV

L.

1865

Hotchkiss, Eliz.

L.

1871

Ingalls, Florence E.

P.

1876

Jerolamen, N.

L.

1873

Jerolamen, Joanna

P.

1873

Jewett, Caleb

L.

1868

Jewett, Edna

L.

1868

Kennedy, Emily M.

L.

1866

Kimball, Thomas.

L.

1870

Knickerbocker, J. H.

L.

1876

Knickerbocker, Julia A.

L.

1876

Leland. Reuben

P.

1872

Leland Fannie E. .

L.

1872

Lewis, Wm. E

P.

1869

Lewis David

L.

1879

Lewis, Mary A

L.

1879

Lewis, Susan.

L.

1879

Lewis, Maggie

L.

1879

McClure, Helen A.

L.

1874

McDonald, Donald .

P.

1874

McDonald, Mrs. D.

P.

1876

McEwen, Rebecca

L.

1860

McKettrick, Isabella

P.

1860

McKettrick, Agnes

P.

1860

McKettrick, Margaret

L.

1866

McLeod,Mary. .

P.

1876

McLennan, K. D.

P.

1874

McLennan, Mary .

P.

1874

McLennan, Hannah.

P.

1876

May, Isabella F.

L.

1866

Meisel, Christian

P.

1872

Miller, L. J.

L.

1858

Miller, Jesse M.

L.

1858

Miller, Angeline

L.

1856

Miller, Adaline

P.

1866

Monroe, Jas. L.

P.

1858

Monroe, J. H

P.

1863

Monroe, Mary A

L.

1872

Morris, Mary P.

P.

1868

Morrison, Christiana

P.

1863

Murphy Helen J

P.

1868

Niles. Sarah E.

P.

1863

Ostrander, J H.

P.

1878

Parmely Lucia A.

P.

1863

Pierce, Janet

L.

1862

Plough, Emily

P.

1858

Plum Mary D.

P.

1870

Pomeroy Charlotte A.

P.

1864

Pressley, Susan

L.

1870

Putnam, John El.

P.

1869

Putnam, Emma C.

P.

1870

Remington, James

L.

1863

Remington, Mrs. J.

P.

1863

Roach, Wm. J.

P.

1865

Roach, Margaret

L.

1865

Rogers, Peter L.

L.

1866

Rogers, Mrs. L. A.

L.

1866

Root,Frances F.

L.

1856

Sayles, R. F.

L.

1856

Sayles, Marshall F.

L.

1856

Sayles, Rhoda

L.

1856

Sayles, Melissa .

P.

1858

Sayles, Ida M.

L.

1871

Schadt, John T.

P.

1876

Schadt, Magdaline

P.

1876

Scheurmann Cornelia

P.

1862

Scriver, Geo. H.

L.

1863

Scriver, Mrs. G.H.

P.

1864

Sham, Samuel C.

L.

1866

Smalley, William

L.

1871

Smalley, Cordelia

L.

1871

Smith, Sarah

L.

1860

Smith, Peter

L.

1860

Smith, Geo R.

L.

1870

Smith, Rachel

L.

1871

Smith, Millie .

P.

1873

Stewart, Ellen J.

L.

1861

Sullivan Adam S.

L.

1865

Sullivan Cordelia

L.

1865

Tomar, H. D.

L.

1863

Tomar, Mrs. H. D.

L.

1863

Townsend, Melissa

L.

1870

Travis, Ira C

L.

1869

Travis, Alta A.

L.

1869

Trombley, Leon

P.

1857

Trombley M. E.

P.

1856

Valentine Elfrida

P.

1864

Wanless David

L.

1873

Wanless Christine

L.

1873

Wortman, Anna H

P.

1858

DECEASED

Angell, Richard

P.

1862

Bishop, Mary T.

P.

1867

Bradley, Huldah L. . .

P.

1880

Brewster, Sophronia .

L.

1866

Calhoun, Mary.

L.

1872

Cathcart, Sarah

L.

1867

Eaton, J. D. .

P.

1870

Ewing, Sarah M. .

L.

1876

Gordon, Mrs. Henry

P.

1864

Hamet, Susanna

P.

1861

Hayes, Clorinda J.

L.

1873

Hazen, Ida J. .

L.

1871

Hazen, Veldora

P.

1877

Johnston, Hannah R

P.

1858

McCormick, Matilda

L.

1861

McPherson, Dr. W. .

L.

1867

Plum, Wheeler L.

L.

1870

Rogers, Elizabeth .

P.

1858

Sayles, Douglass J

P.

1868

Sayles, Ellen E.

P.

1866

Sherman, Ophelia

P.

1858

Smith, Jeanette

P.

1860

Smith, Catherine

P.

1860

Southworth, Chas.

L.

1858

Valentine, Juliette

P.

1862

Vincent Harriet

P.

1869

Walton, Louisa C.

P.

1866

Wands, Phebe O. .

L.

1873

Watkins, Fanny

L.

1869

 

 

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